changeset 10845:848ba2d66942

Update references to swing.properties from lib to conf
author chegar
date Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:56:56 +0100
parents 652e4f19cdf6
children b4f097e9ba7d
files src/java.desktop/share/classes/javax/swing/UIManager.java src/java.desktop/share/classes/javax/swing/plaf/multi/doc-files/multi_tsc.html
diffstat 2 files changed, 7 insertions(+), 7 deletions(-) [+]
line wrap: on
line diff
--- a/src/java.desktop/share/classes/javax/swing/UIManager.java	Mon Oct 20 13:51:25 2014 +0100
+++ b/src/java.desktop/share/classes/javax/swing/UIManager.java	Mon Oct 20 13:56:56 2014 +0100
@@ -106,7 +106,7 @@
  *       use its value as the default look and feel class name. The location
  *       that is checked for <code>swing.properties</code> may vary depending
  *       upon the implementation of the Java platform. Typically the
- *       <code>swing.properties</code> file is located in the <code>lib</code>
+ *       <code>swing.properties</code> file is located in the <code>conf</code>
  *       subdirectory of the Java installation directory.
  *       Refer to the release notes of the implementation being used for
  *       further details.
@@ -281,7 +281,7 @@
     /**
      * The location of the <code>swing.properties</code> property file is
      * implementation-specific.
-     * It is typically located in the <code>lib</code> subdirectory of the Java
+     * It is typically located in the <code>conf</code> subdirectory of the Java
      * installation directory. This method returns a bogus filename
      * if <code>java.home</code> isn't defined.
      */
@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@
         if (javaHome == null) {
             javaHome = "<java.home undefined>";
         }
-        return javaHome + sep + "lib" + sep + "swing.properties";
+        return javaHome + sep + "conf" + sep + "swing.properties";
     }
 
 
--- a/src/java.desktop/share/classes/javax/swing/plaf/multi/doc-files/multi_tsc.html	Mon Oct 20 13:51:25 2014 +0100
+++ b/src/java.desktop/share/classes/javax/swing/plaf/multi/doc-files/multi_tsc.html	Mon Oct 20 13:56:56 2014 +0100
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@
 <p>
 It's easy to use auxiliary look and feels with Swing. To instruct 
 Swing to use the Multiplexing look and feel, all an application 
-has to do is modify the <code>$JDKHOME/lib/swing.properties</code>
+has to do is modify the <code>$JDKHOME/conf/swing.properties</code>
 file to include a definition of the <code>swing.auxiliarylaf</code>
 property. Swing treats the <code>swing.auxiliarylaf</code>
 property as a comma-separated list of <code>LookAndFeel</code>
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@
 <p>
 To tell Swing to use both these look and feels 
 -- and to use a default look and feel at the same time -- your application 
-could simply add the following line to the <code>$JDKHOME/lib/swing.properties</code> file:
+could simply add the following line to the <code>$JDKHOME/conf/swing.properties</code> file:
 </p>
 
 <p>
@@ -472,7 +472,7 @@
 </p>
 
             <p> To do that, all the user has to do is modify 
-              the <code>$JDKHOME/lib/swing.properties</code> 
+              the <code>$JDKHOME/conf/swing.properties</code> 
               file to include a definition of the <code>swing.plaf.multiplexinglaf</code> 
               property. Swing then treats the <code>swing.plaf.multiplexinglaf</code> 
               property as a <code>LookAndFeel</code> 
@@ -483,7 +483,7 @@
               that is a better match for their needs than the Multiplexing 
               look and feel 
 	      (<code>javax.swing.plaf.multi.MultiLookAndFeel</code>), 
-              the user could include the following line in <code>$JDKHOME/lib/swing.properties</code>:
+              the user could include the following line in <code>$JDKHOME/conf/swing.properties</code>:
 </p>
 
 <p>